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Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems

Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems

Every Community Food Lab project is about rebuilding the relationship between cities and food, bringing new value to the health, economy and sustainability of communities. One project, OPEN FOOD, is a series of single topic booklets that introduce, explain and share various parts of local food systems.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.


Community Food Lab Brings Design Thinking to Food Systems - Recipes

Seed Savers training.

The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing, and collective impact. The assessment and research theories have been developed from social field theory and community capitals.

From this understanding, and community input within the pilot three years of the program, CFS has created core values and definitions for food systems sectors that allow for cross-cutting research within the first phase of the process. Additionally, CFS operating procedures are followed and encouraged within coalition meetings and priority projects.

Community Core Values: The Community Food Systems Program has been developed based on community engagement practices of public interest design, strategic doing and collective impact. Additionally, the community capitals framework informed the initial pilot in terms of determining assets to research within communities. The initial 7 capitals evolved to include 6 asset areas based on strategic partner participation and critique in the pilot phase.

Equity: equitable access to social goods, services, property, freedom of speech includes equal opportunity for access to a healthy and good quality of life. Education: experiences and programming related to food systems and health for a deeper understanding and increased opportunities to build skills.
Wellness: positive health status of a community, and individuals that live in it, as it relates to access to affordable and effective options for quality of life. Environment (built and natural): surrounding conditions that include both natural environment and built space in which a person or animal lives.
Policy: principles or actions that have been adopted by governments, businesses, and individuals to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. Economy: wealth and resources of a community or region that relate to the development and consumption of goods and services.

Food System Sectors: Due to the complexity of food systems, our work seeks to understand the various components and sectors within the food system and how they connect and impact, or are impacted by, community assets.

Production: science, art, or occupation that involves cultivating land, raising crops, feeding, breeding, or raising livestock as well as hunting, fishing, or foraging may include gardening, specialty crop production, urban farming. Transformation + Processing: transformation of raw ingredients, physically or chemically, transforming into a value-added product may include value-added processing, freezing and canning, butcher shop.
Distribution + Marketing: moving product from farm or processing site to consumer may include grocery stores, food hubs, food boxes, community-supported agriculture (CSA). Consumption + Access: opportunities for an individual to gain access to food in a physically safe, financially viable, and culturally competent way may include restaurants, food pantries, food trucks, meal assistance programs.
Resource Management: efficient and effective deployment and allocation of community and business resources as it relates to land, water, soil, plants, food, and created materials: may include conservation programs, food waste recovery, composting.

Operating Principles:

Equity and Inclusion: equity in all parts of decision making works against inequities seen and at any chance, try to bring disenfranchised groups to the decision-making process

Communication and Collaboration: Open and honest communication, completeness and authentic conversations

Respect: Acceptance of differing opinions, and willingness to come to a compromise when needed

Collective Action: Set and work towards common goals determined by the coalition

Shared Purpose and Participation: Sincere participation and shared-purpose among the groups in meetings and activity

Take a look at this slide presentation for more information on Global, Local, and Community Food Systems.

UPDATE COMING SOON! The Agricultural Urbanism Toolkit (to be renamed Community Food Systems Toolkit) is a resource for communities to learn about community food systems design and the tactics used to develop local food systems. It can be used as a full book or portions can be downloaded for specific tactics. In the booklet you will find an overview of agricultural urbanism as a design strategy as well as a brief synopsis of the Community Food Systems Program design process and its role in local food system development. The booklet provides an overview of 19 tactics from small- to large-scale implementation of local food system opportunities, ranging from gardening to urban farming to food hubs. Each tactic describes the goal, community benefits, and community outcomes it reveals best management practices nationally, as well as local practices from communities that have partnered in the Community Food Systems Program design process.