Traditional recipes

Luckiest New Year's Foods Slideshow

Luckiest New Year's Foods Slideshow

Lucky traditional party dishes from all over the world

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Ring-shaped cakes and other baked goods symbolize wholeness and the completion of a full year’s cycle. In Greece, there’s vasilopita, a round, anise-flavored cake with a coin hidden inside; in Mexico, they make rosca de reyes, a sweet, ring-shaped bread that’s studded with dried fruit and baked with a tiny figurine of baby Jesus inside; and a long-held Dutch tradition is to feast on puffy, doughnut-like fritters called oliebollen, which are filled with apples and raisins and dusted with powdered sugar.

Click here for more ring-shaped foods and their recipes.

Ring-Shaped Cakes

cristinaclochina/iStockPhoto

Ring-shaped cakes and other baked goods symbolize wholeness and the completion of a full year’s cycle. In Greece, there’s vasilopita, a round, anise-flavored cake with a coin hidden inside; in Mexico, they make rosca de reyes, a sweet, ring-shaped bread that’s studded with dried fruit and baked with a tiny figurine of baby Jesus inside; and a long-held Dutch tradition is to feast on puffy, doughnut-like fritters called oliebollen, which are filled with apples and raisins and dusted with powdered sugar.

Click here for more ring-shaped foods and their recipes.

Dumplings

Because dumplings resemble the gold ingots that were once China’s currency, eating them represents the hope for an auspicious new year. If you’re making them yourself, however, look out — superstition warns against counting the dumplings, for fear that it will lead to scarcity in the new year. Another ancient belief that doubles as a teaching moment: Any bad feelings between family members must be resolved before the dumplings are cooked; if they’re not, evil spirits will steal them.

Don’t do meat? Try these vegetable dumplings.

Fish

Tanya_F/iStockPhoto

In China, a whole steamed fish symbolizes a long and healthy life, and oysters and prawns are lucky, too. In Poland, one serves pickled herring at midnight; in Italy, dried salt cod stars in a variety of holiday dishes; and in Germany, you simply can’t celebrate the day without noshing on carp, which often appears in a stew. Germans take it one step further, though — many tuck a few carp scales into their wallets afterward to keep from running out of money in the following year.

Check out the five safest fish for your family to eat.

Grapes

In Spain, New Year’s Eve means one thing: a whole lot of grapes. At midnight, everyone from grandmothers to teenagers starts popping the fruit into their mouths one-by-one, in time with the local clock tower’s chimes. The saying goes that if you manage to swallow all 12 before the last stroke of midnight, you can count on a prosperous year. Today, the custom is also going strong in Portugal, Cuba, Venezuela, and a handful of other countries.

Try making this grape ice cream with the leftovers.

Greens

The leaves of greens are thought to resemble folded money and supposedly portend a rise in economic fortune. In Germany, sauerkraut (pickled cabbage) is a New Year’s must; in Denmark, it’s kale sweetened with cinnamon and sugar; and in the U.S., sautéed collard greens are an integral part of a New Year’s meal. In Iran and other countries that celebrate the Persian New Year, fresh herbs, which represent fruitfulness in the coming year, find their way into rice dishes and oven-baked omelettes.

Kale chips are a healthy (and lucky) finger food.

Click here for more Traditional and Lucky New Year's Foods.


15+ Best Recipes to Make on New Year's Day for a Lucky 2021

Because we could all use a little more luck this next year.

Some New Year's superstitions say that eating the right foods at the beginning of the year can help bring you an abundance of luck. So if you're looking to turn things around (or keep them going strong) in 2021, you can do a whole lot worse than cooking up a big New Year's brunch filled with all the lucky foods.

Luckily (see what we did there?) our friends at Delish put together a list of lucky New Year's Foods &mdash and it's filled with delicious things. There are black eyed peas, of course, but also fish, noodles, pork, and even grapes, all suggestions from a variety of different cultures and traditions. While you could pick and choose, we say cover your bases and try as many lucky foods as you can! After a year like 2020, we need all the luck we can get.

Below, we've rounded up some best New Years Day lunch ideas that may throw some prosperity your way. We've got options here for lunch, brunch, drinks and dessert. The most well-known New Year's Day meal is, of course, the Southern tradition of collard greens, black-eyed peas, and cornbread, but we've got recipes that'll give delicious twists on all of those, like a collard slaw and a spicy black-eyed peas stew. Check out our New Year's Day lunch recipes here, and if you don't feel like cooking, see if there's a restaurant open on New Year's Day near you that's serving up these lucky plates.


40 New Year's Good-Luck Foods to Bring Health, Wealth, and Happiness in 2021

Make these delicious recipes a part of your New Year's Day tradition.

Even if New Year's Eve parties and grand celebrations are off the table this year, there are so many ways that let you keep your favorite New Year's traditions alive, whether it's toasting with champagne cocktails or scarfing down a hearty New Year's brunch. Setting yourself up for success in the year ahead is arguably one of the best ways to celebrate. For some people, that means making a New Year's resolution, while for others it simply calls for picking up a cute daily planner. But there's another, lesser-known tradition practiced by people around the world: eating a variety of good-luck foods on January 1.

Certain foods, like noodles, cabbage, and lentils, symbolize good fortune in the new year. After downing plenty of bubbly and sweet treats on New Year's Eve, start 2021 off right with these New Year's good-luck foods that all promise wealth, prosperity, and good fortune in the coming year. Take a note from different cultural traditions from a range of countries around the world as you make these delicious recipes, everything from green side dishes to crowd-pleasing pork dinners.

The color green symbolizes luck &mdash think about four-leaf clovers, dollar bills, and jade jewelry. As if that's not enough, eating a plate full of greens (kale, green beans, and Brussels sprouts) will start your year off on a healthy note.

Try these recipes:

In many Asian countries, people eat long noodles on New Year's Day to lengthen their life. One catch: You can't break the noodle from your plate to your mouth.


3. Grilled Shrimp

Avoid the popcorn shrimp or fried crab claws and give a grilled shrimp appetizer some love. A 3.5-ounce serving of cooked shrimp contains about 99 calories, less than a gram of fat and 24 grams of protein, making it a low-calorie, high-protein option. "Don't fry or bread anything," says registered dietitian Breea Johnson. "Instead, try grilled shrimp, chicken or grass-fed beef on mini skewers for healthy bite-sized appetizers." Add some zing to shrimp without piling on a bunch of calories by skewering them with grilled vegetables and marinating the combination in a mixture of cilantro, chives, garlic and a drizzle of olive oil.

Avoid the popcorn shrimp or fried crab claws and give a grilled shrimp appetizer some love. A 3.5-ounce serving of cooked shrimp contains about 99 calories, less than a gram of fat and 24 grams of protein, making it a low-calorie, high-protein option. "Don't fry or bread anything," says registered dietitian Breea Johnson. "Instead, try grilled shrimp, chicken or grass-fed beef on mini skewers for healthy bite-sized appetizers." Add some zing to shrimp without piling on a bunch of calories by skewering them with grilled vegetables and marinating the combination in a mixture of cilantro, chives, garlic and a drizzle of olive oil.


While this year's New Year's Eve festivities may look a little different due to the coronavirus pandemic, there are plenty of ways to make the evening feel special for you and your closest family members and friends. Whenever we dream of a celebration, it always involves lots of delicious food. From serving individual desserts such as Martha's Warm Chocolate Pudding Cakes to preparing an easy one-pot dinner with minimal clean-up, like the Baked Chicken Legs with Chickpeas, Olives, and Greens pictured here, we have 31 recipes that are perfect for an intimate and memorable night.

If you want to wow your guests without spending too much time in the kitchen, try our recipe for Chicken-and-Polenta Puttanesca Melts. Chicken cutlets and polenta are seared in a skillet, then nestled in marinara sauce made with pitted olives and capers everything is topped with mozzarella cheese and baked until bubbling and golden brown. While it's absolutely delicious, the best part of this recipe is that it takes only 25 minutes to prepare. Looking for a festive side dish to complete the meal? How about our recipe for Broccolini with Peperoncini? Italian red chile peppers and plenty of garlic gives the mild relative to broccoli a flavorful, spicy finish.

For dessert, go for something spectacularly chocolate-flavored. Everyone will save room for a slice of our Mile-High Triple-Chocolate-Espresso Mousse Pie, which features a delicious cookie crumb crust, double chocolate mousse filling, and luscious espresso cream smoothed over the top. Another, more humble, option is to serve bowls of old-fashioned rice pudding, but with a very modern twist&mdasha sea-salt caramel sauce drizzled over the top.

Ring in the New Year with 31 recipes that are perfect for a small celebration.


Cook Up Some Good Luck With These Traditional New Year's Day Recipes

According to tradition, New Year&rsquos Day supper will bring you fortune in the year to come. Here are our favorite recipes for Greens, Black-Eyed Peas, Cornbread, Hoppin&rsquo John, and Pot Likker Soup. According to Southern traditions, you will have good luck for the entire year if you have the traditional New Year&rsquos Day supper. That means a meal of greens, hoppin&rsquo John, black-eyed peas, cornbread, and pot likker soup. Here are our favorite New Year&rsquos recipes. We guarantee they&rsquoll taste great&mdashthe luck is up to you. For a new twist on Southern traditions, try the Hoppin&rsquo John Noodle Bowls, or the oven-roasted Black-Eyed Peas for Munching. If you want the classic New Year&rsquos recipes, you can enjoy our mouthwatering Southern-Style Collard Greens, Pot Likker, or Good Luck Greens and Peas with Ham. However you cook up your New Year&rsquos recipes, hopefully these traditional Southern New Year's Day recipes will mean your table will be filled with the perfect dishes for good luck.


As part of the celebration of 30 years of Martha Stewart Living, we asked former staffers what their favorite recipes are, the ones they still make in their own kitchens years after the photo shoot took place. Join us as we stroll down memory lane and you'll find a rich assortment of cherished recipes&mdashour past food editors cite everything from lobster and corn chowder to banana bread as the stellar recipes they choose to make time and time again.

Among those who share their favorite recipes in the slides ahead is is Lucinda Scala Quinn, our former executive editorial director of food, and the founder of MadHungry. Over the course of her 16 years working with Martha and the Living team, Lucinda oversaw the creation of hundreds of recipes and even developed many of those recipes herself. Among her top favorites? Several pizza recipes she developed for a story in 2015, including the Jackson Pollock-inspired Eggplant, Pistachio, and Pomegranate Pizza that's shown here.

A very different pizza is one recipe selected by former food editor Anna Kovel. She recalls eating the butternut squash pizza with a hazelnut pizza dough base in the test kitchen and being unable to stop&mdashthe combination was that good. But it's not just pizza recipes that stuck with our former food editors. There's also pasta, including our beloved One-Pan Pasta ("We couldn't have a 30th anniversary celebration without it," Jennifer Aaronson, former editorial director of food and entertaining and now culinary director of Martha and Marley Spoon, says). There's also a defining take on Macaroni and Cheese that has yet to be beat. Susan Spungen, founding food editor of Martha Stewart Living and a cookbook author and food stylist, developed it in 2001 and says that it's still the recipe she uses when she makes the ultimate comfort food, all these years later.

Our food editors didn't forget about dessert&mdashyou'll find that our much-lauded and much loved One-Bowl Chocolate Cake and can't-be-beat chocolate frosting are two still back-pocket recipes when a sweet treat is called for. There's also an inventive ice cream cake shaped like a watermelon that hits the spot years later. It's certainly the most spectacular no-bake dessert we can think of.

Enjoy these, and more, favorite everyday recipes from 30 years of Martha Stewart Living.


These Dishes Promise Good Luck And Prosperity In The New Year

This year, starting a new year will actually mean starting a new decade. While we roar into 2020, the hope is luck, success, and prosperity. Or, maybe, things at least being a bit better than they were last year. Many cultures have certain “good luck foods” they eat to usher in the new year. Whether they work or not is hard to say but when they also happen to be delicious, what’s the harm in giving them a try?

Baked French Toast with Apples & Honey

Baked French Toast with Apples & Honey at B&O American Brasserie in Baltimore.

At B&O American Brasserie in Baltimore, for New Year’s Day brunch, chef Scott Hines will offer a baked French toast with apples and honey inspired by the flavors of his childhood. Borrowing from Rosh Hashanah traditions, the honey and apples symbolize a sweet year ahead.

Pork Fried Rice Omelet

Pork Fried Rice Omelet at Dirty Habit in Washington D.C..

At Dirty Habit in Washington D.C., they offer the Pork Fried Rice Omelet. This dish is Chef Kyoo’s version of omurice or “omelet rice,” which started in Japan. The Japanese chef who created this dish was trying to adapt a Western-style omelet for a more traditional Asian palate. They used fried rice instead of vegetables, ham and cheese. Instead of cooking the egg into the fried rice, the egg was used to cover the rice – like an omelet. Chef Kyoo’s omurice is filled with cooked rice, pork belly, shiitake mushrooms, scallions and soy sauce.

Pork Belly Poblano

Pork Poblano at Butchertown Hall in Nashville.

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Ham is often a holiday centerpiece, but pork is specifically known to bring good luck for the New Year. A symbol of prosperity in many cultures, you can find most southerners eating a pork dish on New Year's Eve or hosting a pig roast on New Year's Day. Nashville's own Butchertown Hall, known for their Texas-meets-Tennessee cuisine and wide variety of smoked meats, is featuring a Pork Belly Poblano stuffed with queso fresco on their à la carte New Year's Eve Menu. Served over romesco in a chili tempura shell, this pork dish pack enough flavor to get you feeling lucky all year. Prefer sweet over spice? Try the house-cured and smoked Bacon Lollipops topped with pumpkin-pecan butter.

Dover Sole at Bluebird London NYC.

At Bluebird London NYC, this beautiful dish is prepared with fennel, saffron beurre blanc, and trout roe. "Dover Sole is such a wonderful fish and we have it on our New Year’s Eve menu as I've always considered fish to be a lucky food to eat going into a new year. Fish only swim in one direction and as we kick off a fresh start it is great to be in the mindset of moving forward, never back,” said chef Danila Bogdan.

Cassoulet at a.kitchen in Philadelphia.

At a.kitchen in Philadelphia, a classic French stew of tarbais beans, lamb and pork ragout, duck confit, and garlic pork sausage. Imported from France, the tarbais beans are believed to bring great luck to all who consume this dish.

Kale and Onion Fritter

Kale and Onion Fritter at Night Music in New York City.

Greens such as kale are considered lucky as they resemble paper money. At Night Music in New York City, this vegan Indian-inspired kale fritter is made with cilantro with avocado crema, raita, tamarind, onion and kale.

Donuts at Hutton Hotel in Nashville.

Ring-shaped cakes and other rounded sweet treats bring a full circle of luck to the eater. In some traditions, a coin is baked inside to bring an extra serving of luck to the one who finds it. The coffee shop located in the lobby of Hutton Hotel in Nashville has an in-house pastry team that serves up deliciously unique donuts with flavors like key lime, lemon poppyseed, strawberry, Cinnamon Toast, s’mores and more.


All over the world: Champagne

Though it's hard to trace Champagne's exact path to its rightful place at the top of any New Year's Eve drinks list, the bubbly beverage was already gaining in popularity as the festive drink of choice by the late 1800s, according to Imbibe Magazine. Of course, there's no reason to limit yourself to bona fide French Champagne. There are plenty of other sparkling wines, such as Italian Prosecco and Spanish Cava (which are both usually much cheaper than traditional Champagne but still very tasty), with which to ring in the new year!


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