Traditional recipes

Parents in Australia Concerned Over Cannabis Energy Drinks Promoting Marijuana Usage

Parents in Australia Concerned Over Cannabis Energy Drinks Promoting Marijuana Usage

Cannabis Energy Drink is not made with THC, the mind-altering ingredient found in marijuana.

Parents in Australia are skeptical about Cannabis Energy Drink sold in some supermarkets and are protesting to have the drink removed from shelves because it promotes drugs to children.

The energy drink is produced in Austria and contains hemp seed extract. It does not contain Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or any psychoactive substances, so it does not have the same effect that marijuana has.

The main concern that parents have are the energy drink’s advertisements. Many of the ads posted on Cannabis Energy Drink’s Facebook page, for example, depict a lot of young people, which seems to promote drugs.

“I spoke to one of the workers about it,” Simone Calnon, a mother of two, told The West Australian, “and she giggled and said, ‘It’s just a drink.’ It seems that cannabis is already a cultural norm for some.”

The Independent Grocers Alliance (IGA) in Huntingdale will be removing Cannabis Energy Drinks from shelves following the complaints, though the drink is marketed as an energy drink and there are more concerns over the caffeine content. All remaining cartons of the drink will be returned to the supplier.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.


Supreme Court vs Online Sales Tax

Online shopaholics may be forced to break open the piggy bank sooner than they wish.

Sales tax is a consumption tax imposed by the government on the sale of goods and services. At this point in time, the law states that “if a business is shipping to a state where it doesn’t have an office or warehouse of physical presence — it doesn’t have to collect that state’s sales tax”. In essence, no presence, no tax.

However, the Supreme Court may soon make the decision to bring sales tax to online shopping. This case has been brought to court as more than 40 states are claiming they are losing out on “altogether $26 billion annually in tax revenue each year” causing them to have to cut government programs. Many are aggressively pointing out that online companies still make use of the state’s services, e.g. postal service.

The case’s controversial nature stems from the fact that a major law is being revised. Many of these companies are set up online for the absence of sales tax. In addition to that, i t will cost more for consumers to shop online. This may decrease the number of consumers for certain companies and will decrease their profits. Although large businesses (e.g. ASOS online) may be mildly troubled by this, those who will be severely affected are small businesses (e.g. sellers on Etsy).

Actively affecting this issue are the consumers themselves. A decrease in customers may put small businesses in the red. This will, in turn, impact the economy as a majority of online shopping involves third-party sellers. Furthermore, if the sales tax causes a significant drop in consumers in a particular state, the business may cease shipping to that state. This will not only leave the state back where they started in terms of revenue but also lower the material living standard for the community.

This then leads to the question of what law will be implemented in regards to websites such as Etsy, eBay, and Amazon? These websites are made up of many third-party sellers, most of which are small businesses. The main company itself may be required to charge sales tax but will third-party sellers be given the liberty to make their own tax-collecting decisions?

Many outcomes could occur if this new law is passed. Due to the concept of ‘status quo’, most consumers will not mind paying sales tax to their current supplier, as it is more convenient than looking for a new store. However, those unused to online shopping may now be further deterred from it. Even though sales tax will not put a huge dent in one’s wallet, the sole idea of paying extra will stand out to consumers, linking back to the concept of ‘vividness’.

Another outcome is that as big companies implement a sales tax, smaller companies will follow suit. This prediction stems from the idea of ‘herd behaviour’, in which people tend to go with the majority when new or unexpected situations occur.

Implementing a sales tax is predicted to bring in tens of billions of dollars in revenue annually, allowing the government to increase funding to important sectors and facilities. In their (over)confidence, multiple states have already begun to make plans for the new revenue that they predict will come their way.

A final decision from the Supreme Court is expected by the end of June, so keep your eyes and ears open for any upcoming news.