Traditional recipes

Taste Test: Pickles

Taste Test: Pickles

Our pickle picks: the best bread-and-butter chips and dill spears.

Calorie counts on pickle labels are so low that these crunchy treats seem like the perfect summer picnic, snack, and sandwich addition—8 calories per serving on one label we saw. But, no surprise, salt can be an issue: 569mg of sodium for that same single dill spear. Salt acts as a natural preservative during the pickling process, and dill pickles have especially high levels because extra salt is added for flavor. Still, it's possible to pick pickles with paltry salt. For our testing, we only tasted contenders with less than 230mg for chips and 300mg for spears.

Take a close look at how the label defines a serving size, though. The number of chips in a 1-ounce serving varied from three to eight on brands we checked. As for spears, the nutrition numbers may not even apply to a whole pickle; we found several brands that listed serving sizes as two-thirds or three-quarters of a spear.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

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WINNER BEST DILL SPEAR: Great Value Kosher Dill Spears, $1.98 (24 ounces), 280mg sodium in 1 spear
Dill purists, rejoice! The Walmart house brand is garlicky and vinegary, with spot-on pucker factor and just a hint of chile heat. May never make it to the sandwich plate because you'll want to eat yours straight from the jar.

WINNER BEST BREAD-AND-BUTTER CHIPS: Mt. Olive Old-Fashioned Sweet Bread & Butter Chips, $2.39 (24 ounces), 180mg sodium in 6 chips
Seriously crunchy (almost celery-like), with a perfectly balanced sugar-to-spice ratio: Just a hint of sweetness complements notes of earthy, fragrant clove.

HOW WE TESTED: A panel of Cooking Light staff sampled 13 bread-and-butter chips and five dill spears in two blind tastings.


We Tried 5 Kinds of Kosher Dill Pickles And These Were Our Favorite

There&rsquos nothing worse than a crunchless pickle spear or a whole dill without a vinegary bite.

There’s a certain visceral pleasure that comes with biting into a fresh (and, ideally, cold) pickle. The burst of acidity across your tongue, not to mention the crunch factor, makes up for the inevitability of pickle juice dripping down your chin. Even when not eaten solo, pickles add a delicious dimension to nearly every dish they’re added to. Without pickle spears, ordering from delis and sandwich shops would be decidedly less fun (and less delicious).

Still, pickles are only satisfying when they represent the pinnacle of their genre. There’s nothing worse than a crunchless pickle spear or a whole dill without a vinegary bite. So to help you find the best pickles to keep on hand, we sampled five brands of kosher dill pickles, all of which are available online or in stores. Here are our rankings, from best to worst.


How Pickles Are Made: Refrigeration, Pasteurization, and Fermentation

Most jarred pickles are pickled in a mixture of vinegar and seasonings. After they’re jarred, they can be pasteurized—heated to kill bacteria and make them shelf-stable. Pickles that are not pasteurized must be kept refrigerated throughout curing, shipping, and storage. It’s also possible to make pickles without any vinegar at all. This style of pickle, called lacto-fermented, is made by immersing cucumbers in a salt brine and allowing them to ferment for days or weeks. During that time, natural bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum) and yeast consume the cucumbers’ sugar and create tart lactic acid, which pickles and preserves them. The bacteria gives the pickle brine a distinctly cloudy, almost milky appearance. Like refrigerated pickles made with vinegar, these lacto-fermented pickles are never heated and must be kept refrigerated after packaging.

Our lineup included a mix of styles. Seven products were vinegar pickles. Of those, four were shelf-stable and three were refrigerated. We also included one lacto-fermented pickle.


  • 4 teaspoons salt
  • 2 chocolate bar biscuit croissant topping
  • 1 jelly cotton candy
  • ½ jelly gummies
  • 2 cups liquorice chocolate
  • 2 jelly beans bonbon
  • 2 caramels tart gummi bears
  • 6 butterscotch caramel lollipops
  • 12 tbsp butter
  • ¼ cup sugar

Cupcake ipsum dolor sit amet chocolate bar halvah carrot cake donut. Caramels chocolate bar donut cookie. Halvah apple pie apple pie brownie donut cheesecake. Powder sugar plum liquorice. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake. I love cake indeed.

Chupa chups sesame snaps chocolate cake tart icing chupa chups sesame snaps. Croissant marshmallow biscuit. Cookie topping wafer bonbon tootsie roll tart. Fruitcake topping tart caramels wafer donut topping pie pastry. Tiramisu caramels tiramisu marshmallow pudding pastry.

Cupcake ipsum dolor sit amet chocolate bar halvah carrot cake donut. Caramels chocolate bar donut cookie. Halvah apple pie apple pie brownie donut cheesecake. Powder sugar plum liquorice. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake.

Chupa chups sesame snaps chocolate cake tart icing chupa chups sesame snaps. Croissant marshmallow biscuit. Cookie topping wafer bonbon tootsie roll tart. Fruitcake topping tart caramels wafer donut topping pie pastry. Tiramisu caramels tiramisu marshmallow pudding pastry. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake.

Cupcake ipsum dolor sit amet chocolate bar halvah carrot cake donut. Caramels chocolate bar donut cookie. Halvah apple pie apple pie brownie donut cheesecake. Powder sugar plum liquorice. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake. I love cake indeed.

Chupa chups sesame snaps chocolate cake tart icing chupa chups sesame snaps. Croissant marshmallow biscuit. Cookie topping wafer bonbon tootsie roll tart. Fruitcake topping tart caramels wafer donut topping pie pastry. Tiramisu caramels tiramisu marshmallow pudding pastry.

Cupcake ipsum dolor sit amet chocolate bar halvah carrot cake donut. Caramels chocolate bar donut cookie. Halvah apple pie apple pie brownie donut cheesecake. Powder sugar plum liquorice. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake.

Chupa chups sesame snaps chocolate cake tart icing chupa chups sesame snaps. Croissant marshmallow biscuit. Cookie topping wafer bonbon tootsie roll tart. Fruitcake topping tart caramels wafer donut topping pie pastry. Tiramisu caramels tiramisu marshmallow pudding pastry. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake.

Cupcake ipsum dolor sit amet chocolate bar halvah carrot cake donut. Caramels chocolate bar donut cookie. Halvah apple pie apple pie brownie donut cheesecake. Powder sugar plum liquorice. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake. I love cake indeed.

Chupa chups sesame snaps chocolate cake tart icing chupa chups sesame snaps. Croissant marshmallow biscuit. Cookie topping wafer bonbon tootsie roll tart. Fruitcake topping tart caramels wafer donut topping pie pastry. Tiramisu caramels tiramisu marshmallow pudding pastry.

Cupcake ipsum dolor sit amet chocolate bar halvah carrot cake donut. Caramels chocolate bar donut cookie. Halvah apple pie apple pie brownie donut cheesecake. Powder sugar plum liquorice. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake.

Chupa chups sesame snaps chocolate cake tart icing chupa chups sesame snaps. Croissant marshmallow biscuit. Cookie topping wafer bonbon tootsie roll tart. Fruitcake topping tart caramels wafer donut topping pie pastry. Tiramisu caramels tiramisu marshmallow pudding pastry. Jelly jelly beans candy. Brownie muffin pastry cupcake cake dessert chocolate cake.


#3: B&G Hot Dot Relish (4.4/10)

Pretty ballpark classic, this one tastes sort of like a slightly mushier version of Heinz regular sweet pickle relish, though the ingredients list does mention mustard seed and spices. Not our top choice, but we wouldn't kick it off our dog.


Sour Pickles

Fermentation Recipes

When I was a kid growing up in Chicago, my mother would occasionally take my brother and I to a restaurant called The Pickle Barrel where every table had sour pickles and popcorn. I’m thinking the tables were made from old pickle barrels, but that may just be a fond enhancement of my memory. Having Russian/Ukrainian grandparents on one side of my family meant regular appearances by dill pickles for snacking as well. If you’ve never made your own, the first bite you take of your own homemade pickle will inevitably cause you to exclaim “oh my God, they taste just like pickles!” And they do. And deliciously so at that. You’ll find sour pickle recipe to be simple and the taste will be puckeringly pleasing.

It can be easy for these kosher pickles to become mushy and there are a few techniques to help prevent that from occurring. The primary technique is adding tannins through the addition of tannin-containing leaves such as oak, cherry, bay or other. According to Sandor Katz’ The Art of Fermentation, using unrefined sea salt can help because it can contain calcium and magnesium reinforce the cell walls. When I once received a lesson in making kimchi cucumbers, a korean woman taught to first pour steaming hot water over the cucumbers in order to kill off a microorganism which can lead to faster decomposition. I didn’t try that here, but if you encounter problems, that may help to resolve.This sour pickle recipe / dill pickle recipe comes from the FermentationForum community here at Fermentation Recipes. A contributor with the username of Butterflies contributed the bulk of this recipe but I’ve modified it some based on the forum contributions of others. Thank you all!

  • Medium-sized non-waxed pickling cucumbers (for this recipe, I used 8 medium to large sized ones that fit in a 1 gallon jar.
  • 2 Tablespoons Sea salt for each quart of water
  • Spices including dill, mustard seeds, peppercorns. A tablespoon of each perhaps with more dill.
  • 6 cloves garlic (peeled)
  • A few tannin containing leaves - oak leaves, cherry leaves, bay leaves and grape leaves work well. You can also use a couple of black tea bags.
  1. Mix the brine - Add salt to water and stir to dissolve. Use 2 tablespoons of sea salt per quart of water
  2. Prepare cucumbers and place in the salted water - Clean lightly and cut off the stem tip of the cucumber. Place in a vessel for fermenting. For this recipe I used a 1 gallon Anchor Hocking cookie jar. I often use a fermentation crock like this one. Small batches can be done in [Ball Jars|http://amzn.to/2jcvfGY.
  3. Add the garlic, spices and leaves - To help the cucumbers stay crisp add a few fresh oak leaves, cherry leaves, bay leaves, grape leaves, or a little dry black tea. The tannin helps the pickles stay crisp.
  4. Keep the cucumbers submerged - It is important to make sure the pickles stay below the level of the liquid. A well scrubbed stone or a zip-lock bag filled with water will do. I personally used a ceramic bowl which had some weight to it but also floated due to the displacement. If doing small batches, you can buy weights such as these.
  5. Wait Impatiently - I place my jar in a sunny window as I understand that the uv rays help to keep some microorganisms from growing. If the container is clear you will be able to see bubbles forming after a day or two. Test after five days to see if it is sour enough for your taste. The speed of fermenting will vary depending on the temperature of your room. Mine were ready in a week, but feel free to let this go a few weeks if desired.
  6. Jar it up - Once the pickles are tangy enough for your tastes, transfer to smaller jars (including the brine) and store in the refrigerator. They will continue to ferment inthe refrigerator, but much more slowly. You can leave the pickles whole or cut them into spears or slices. They'll continue to sour more over time but should remain delicious. You can use some of the brine to jump-start your next ferment.

Comments

Sour Pickles — 31 Comments

By cutting off the blossom end of the cucumber you will have crisp pickles. Cutting the end off does something that stops the pickles from getting soft. I used to get mushy pickles till I started doing this.
Happy pickling

Good advice, Bert. I’ve always done this and never had mushy pickles.
The science behind it is that the mould that causes the mushiness is found on the rotting blossom, thus cutting a little bit off this end and gently washing the cukes should keep you safe.
By the way, don’t ever try those pickle crisping powders (aluminum?) – gives the pickles a really weird taste!

* Large Mason Jar and BPA Free Lid
* 20 drops Ionic Magnesium Minerals
* 1/2 tsp concentrated Living Silica
* 1 Capsule Probiotic Bacteria 16 strain
* 10 drops of Concentrated Fulvic Acid fortified with Boron/Zinc.
* 2 tbs of Organic Liquid Aminos
* 4 ounces of Braggs Raw Apple Cider Vinegar
* 2 tbs of Sole Liquid Salt

Added with the regular Basic Formula

Just started a batch of these. I know things vary but about how long? I’m using an airlock so I’d rather not break it until they are close. Thanks.

A week to 10 days is pretty good, but if you’ve got a healthy airlock ferment going, then I’d give it a 3-4 weeks to get nice and sour. Let us know how it comes out. Thanks Lulu

OK, so that didn’t work.
Colleagues said it’s because I used tap water, which I guess makes sense. So I’ve done a new 2L batch with purchased distilled water. Plus I put in a couple of tbsp of sauerkraut liquid.
Fingers crossed, again, but if this doesn’t work then I’m not wasting any more good picking cucumbers!

Sour pickles can be fickle sometimes. What happened that made it not work?

They looked right but tasted horrible.

But this 3rd batch is working! Day 3 and I tested one. Crisp and mildly tangy so I’ll leave them another few days and try again. And I was so bolstered by my success that I started another batch!

Hey Lulu, that’s great news. Your persistence seems to be paying off! I met a Korean woman at a fermentation festival who demonstrated actually pouring boiling water over her cucumber pieces before allowing them to ferment into Cucumber Kimchi. Everyone watching was a bit aghast, but it’s quite possible that the boiling water might kill a certain bacteria that causes problems in fermenting cucumbers while not killing the necessary ones. I can’t say for certain, but that approach might help in stubborn situations with making sour pickles.

I started a batch today. I do I have to tightly seal the container? I loosely covered it to avoid any spill- overs and to avoid”burping” the pickles. What do you recommend?

I wouldn’t tightly seal unless you have some sort of an airlock involved to allow gasses to escape. You can place a lid on top like a plate but one which again allows gasses to escape.

Upon transferring my pickles to smaller mason jars and into the refrigerator all my pickles floated to the top. A few are a bit above the brine. Is this going to cause problems over the next few months. If so, do you have any suggestions on how to keep them subnurged, I will have way too many jars to purchase weights for all of them. Thank you!!

You probably won’t have problems if they are refrigerated. If you are concerned about keeping them submerged without buying a bunch of weights, you can fill small ziplock bags with some water and place on top. Good luck!

I apologize…
I’m new at this & it’s probably a dumb question…..
But Do you peel the cucumbers ?

You don’t peel the cucumbers. Just cut the little nub off the end where the stem attaches. Good luck!

Cut off blossom end or stem end?

The blossom end. Good luck.

Thanks for sharing this recipe! Would the recipe be the same for slices, IE: bread and butter style pickles? Thank you!

Bread and Butter pickles are sweeter as far as I know and there is an addition of sugar to the recipe. Those aren’t my expertise as I prefer the old fashioned sour pickle more. Not sure if those are fermented, or simply pickled in vinegar with added sugar. You of course could slice these in whatever manner you wish. Adding larger quantities of sugar to a fermented pickle recipe could really create an active ferment. Not sure what would happen with that. Good luck and thanks for writing!

Can these pickles be stored at room temperature? If so, for how long? Thanks. Ross

They’ll keep better in the fridge. The longer you keep them out, the more chance that yeast will begin to grow on the surface of the water. If out of the brine, then mold might set in if left out of the fridge.

In the old days people would store fermented things such as pickles or sauerkraut in the room. The difference though is with wood heat and possibly drafty houses there were cool/cold corners in the kitchen or dining room and those corners are where they would put them. Todays modern houses, even older ones with space heaters do not have that so things should be either canned (don’t know how it would work with these pickles) or stored in the fridge.

Could you leave silicone airlocks, rings, and weights on mason jar pickles in fridge, or what do you recommend instead?

Should they have a bad odor? They are firm but smelly.

I’m not sure what happened. Although firm is good, they shouldn’t really smell bad. You’ll need to use your own judgment as to whether they are edible. If they’re sour enough, maybe you can stop the ferment by pouring out the brine, rinsing them off and then storing them in another brine. That might get rid of the odor. Again, your own best judgment is key.

I am absolutely addicted to these pickles. I will never buy pickles again.

These were the best pickles i have made, I did make a mistake with the second batch using the liquid and not replacing the grape leaves or adding more salt. I only did 3 cucumbers each batch, this was not a good year for me with cucumbers. Any recommendation on starting the second batch and using the liquid from the first?

Congrats on the good batch of pickles. Well done! I honestly haven’t tried using liquid from a previous batch in starting a new batch. Often in ferments there are multiple stages of fermentation where different bacteria dominate at different phases. Not sure if that’s true in the case of sour pickles. So unfortunately I can’t advise. Safest to start over but if you try reusing the brine, please write back and let us all know how it turns out.

It really is amazing how results can vary so much. A YouTube video indicated a 7% brine and my pickles were garlicky and just slightly sour after 3 weeks but 1 (of 2) jarful had to be thrown as the fermentation was in too warm an environment (which the video indicated was okay) plus some of the cukes floated above surface and got moldy. I am now on my 2nd batch. The recipe I used specifies a 5% brine. I put in less garlic, more pickling spices, bay leaves, and peppercorns, but forgot the dill. After 3 weeks the pickles are still crunchy but extremely garlicky and spicy and absolutely no sourness. Reading what the problem could be resulted in a gamut of possibilities. Some say the stronger the brine the more sour the pickles will be. But my pickles have 0 sourness. Could it be the lack of dill? The fermentation temperature? Not much choice on this living in the Philippines other than the air conditioned bedroom. The type of cuke? Again, not much choice living in a country that apparently believes one variety of anything is enough (not joking too much about this). I’d be very happy just buying sour pickles but I lived here a year before I found jarred dill pickles so getting sours just ain’t gonna happen. I’m bummed because we were finally able to get some smaller, younger cukes.

Hey Dave. I usualky recommend a 4% brine for sour pickles which is about 2TBSP salt per 4 cups water. Not sure why you didn’t get any sourness. The dill shouldn’t have affected the sourness at all. I suppose if the cubes were scrubbed too clean or irradiated or something that sterilized them then perhaps there wouldn’t be any bacteria to transform the pickles. The brine is really to protect the environment from other microorganism growth. Tooooo much salt and I imagine all bacterial growth would probably cease. Perhaps just give it more time and see what happens. The cooler the environment, the longer it will take.

Your recipe ( not the artical) says to cut off the STEM end of the cuke. I thought it was the flower end tat needed to be trimmed.
Might want to check the recipe here.


Find Out Which Grocery Store-Bought Sweet Pickles Are Best

We tasted six types of bread and butter pickles so you don't have to.

Bread and butter pickles are a staple in refrigerators across the South𠅋ut finding that perfect balance of sweetness and tanginess can be tough. Great for topping burgers, livening up tuna salad, or served alongside a plate of thinly sliced country ham, they add brightness, sweetness, and acidity. Associate editor Hannah Hayes and I taste tested six brands of bread and butter pickles commonly found throughout the South. We judged on appearance, texture, and flavor and found several brands that delivered on all three. Read on to see which ones made the cut. (Or make your own!)

Vlasic Bread and Butter Stackers
Layer these long, thin pickles on a burger, or tuck inside a grilled cheese. These crunchy, sweet pickles are also easy to chop up for homemade relish.

Wickles Wicked Pickle Chips
Wickles are billed as a "sandwich and snack chip" and we agree that you could eat these straight from the jar. If you like heat, that is. Whole chile peppers (and garlic) infuse the brine, making a powerfully spicy, not too sweet pickle.

365 Everyday Value Organic Bread & Butter Chips
Surprisingly, Whole Foods&apos bread and butter pickles were by far the sweetest of the bunch. We liked the pickles&apos crisp texture unlike other brands they were not soggy or rubbery. We recommend these if you have a very strong sweet tooth.

Brooklyn Brine Maple-Bourbon Bread and Butter Pickles
Can Southern-style pickles be made by New Yorkers? Brooklyn Brine&aposs Maple-Bourbon Bread and Butter Pickles have a subtle kick from McKenzie bourbon whiskey and a nice amount of sweetness from maple syrup. Mace, black pepper, coriander, and mustard seeds add complexity. These aren&apost your grandmother&aposs bread and butter pickles, but we liked them a lot.

Blackberry Farm Bread & Butter Pickles
At $14 a jar, these pickles are pricey, but they had the best flavor of the bunch but they come with a pedigree. Made from cucumbers grown at the award-winning Blackberry Farm in Tennessee, they are canned with pungent mustard seeds, onions, and spices. We thought the texture of these pickles was on the soft side they are not very crunchy. Serve on a charcuterie board with cheese and country ham, or chop up the pickles to make relish.

You Might Also Be Interested In

Mt. Olive Bread & Butter Chips
This old-school pickle is probably the kind you grew up eating. These crinkle-cut pickles are tangy-sweet with lots of mustard flavor, and have a pleasantly crunchy texture. If you&aposre looking for classic bread and butter pickle, this brand has been doing it since the 1920s.


Pasteurization Affects Texture . . . to an Extent

When we reviewed dill pickle spears , all the shelf-stable products were soft and soggy, while the refrigerated pickles were crisp and crunchy. That&rsquos because the heat applied to shelf-stable pickles during pasteurization essentially cooks them and can soften their texture. But with whole dill pickles, the differences between the refrigerated and shelf-stable products were more subtle. The refrigerated pickles once again had great crunch, but the shelf-stable options were only &ldquoa little less crisp.&rdquo We quickly came to understand why the lessons we learned about pickle spears didn&rsquot hold true for whole pickles. First, the skin surrounding a whole pickle holds it together and keeps it crisp. Second, whole pickles tend to have more mass than spears and are therefore less affected by the heat of pasteurization and more likely to retain their crunch and snap. We had a slight preference for the texture of the refrigerated pickles, but all the pickles in our lineup were firm and crunchy enough for our tasters.

The heat applied during pasteurization, a necessary step for all shelf-stable jars, essentially cooks the pickles. Pickle spears (left) are especially vulnerable and often turn out soft and soggy. Shelf-stable whole pickles (right) are much more likely to stay firm and crunchy.


Easy Homemade Pickles

Biting into a crunchy pickle is one of life&rsquos small pleasures. And you, dear reader, really should try making your own for a change. They taste better, and you can brag about how you made them yourself. The best part: This recipe for easy homemade pickles requires very little effort.

2 tablespoons mustard seeds

2 cups apple cider vinegar

1. Tightly pack the cucumbers into a heat-safe glass quart jar (or two pint jars). Add the garlic, mustard seeds and dill sprig to the jar.

2. In a small pot, bring the vinegar, water, salt and sugar to a boil over medium-high heat.

3. Pour the brine over the cucumbers and then seal the jar(s). Refrigerate for at least two days before opening, and up to two weeks.

Note: The information shown is Edamam's estimate based on available ingredients and preparation. It should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist's advice.


Bread and Butter Pickles Recipe

  • Author: Steve Gordon
  • Prep Time: 1 hour
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 hours 10 minutes
  • Yield: Approximately 7 pints . 1 x
  • Category: Canning
  • Method: Stove Top
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Follow these easy, step-by-step, photo illustrated instructions for making and canning your very own Bread and Butter Pickles. You’ll never buy pickles again once you’ve made your own. See just how quick and easy it is to make these delicious pickles right in your own kitchen. This recipe can be completed in one day.

Ingredients

  • 6 -lbs of Pickling Cucumbers
  • 3 -lbs Onions, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup Canning or Pickling Salt
  • 4 cups White Vinegar (5% Acidity)
  • 4 cups Sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons Mustard Seed
  • 1½ Tablespoons Celery Seed
  • 1 Tablespoon Pickling Spice
  • 1 teaspoon Turmeric

Instructions

  1. Place cucumbers in sink with cold water.
  2. Scrub each cucumber by hand, DO NOT use a vegetable brush.
  3. Rinse all the cucumbers and drain.
  4. Slice ¼ inch off each end of each cucumber and discard.
  5. Slice the cucumbers into ¼ inch thick slices.
  6. Slice the onions.
  7. Place the sliced cucumbers and onions in a large pot and stir gently by hand to mix.
  8. Sprinkle salt over the mixture.
  9. Cover the mixture with about 2 inches of crushed or cubed ice.
  10. Refrigerate the mixture for 3-4 hours, or overnight, adding more ice as needed during this time. When ready to process pickles, wash jars in hot, soapy water.
  11. Setup your stove and counter area in advance for ease in canning.
  12. Place jars in boiling water for 15 minutes to sterilize.
  13. Place lids and bands in a pot of warm water, not hot or boiling, and let sit until needed.
  14. Drain cucumbers and onions, rinse well to remove salt and let drain.
  15. In a large pot, add Vinegar, Sugar, Mustard Seed, Celery Seed, Pickling Spice, Turmeric, stir well. Bring to a boil over Medium-High heat and boil for 10 minutes.
  16. Add cucumbers and onions to the pot, bring back to low boil and boil for One Minute.
  17. Remove from heat and ladle into jars, leaving ¼ inch head space in each jar.
  18. Remove any air bubbles by inserting a wooden skewer along inside edge of the jar.
  19. Wipe top of jar and rim with a clean damp cloth.
  20. Center a lid on the jar. Add the band, and tighten only finger tight.
  21. Process jars, using the water bath process, for 10 minutes.
  22. Remove jars from canning pot, set aside in a draft free location, undisturbed for 24 hours.
  23. Test jars for proper seal. Store sealed jars in a cool dark place for up to one year.
  24. Enjoy!

Keywords: Bread and Butter Pickles Recipe, award winning, north carolina state fair, made from scratch, home food preservation, southern recipes

Your Comments: Have you ever made pickles? What type have you made? I’d love to hear your comments about our recipe, or about any other pickle recipes you might have tried. It will only take a minute or two for you to share your thoughts with us in the Comments section below. Please note that all of our Comments are moderated. That just means that I personally read each and every one of them before they are approved for our family friendly site here on the Internet. Your comment will not appear immediately, but I’ll do my best to get it posted online as soon as possible. I also try to reply to as many of your comments as I can, so be sure to check back later for that. I do appreciate you taking the time to share your comments with us, and I’ll look forward to hearing from you. Thank you in advance.

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